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On average, the American child is in the company of his parent about 17 hours per week, with the media about 35 hours per week.  Of the two, parent and media, which is more entertaining to the child, and which more critical to his social and emotional development?

When the Media is the ParentOur children are being nurtured and guided by machines — modern media delivery systems – and the media they deliver.  They have taken over the parenting functions that once were performed by human beings.

This may sound like a horror movie plot from the 1950s, but it is a twenty-first century reality. All too often, well-meaning parents have abdicated their roles as nurturers, caregivers, teachers, confidantes, guides, and role models—leaving TV, videogames, movies, smart phones, and the internet to fill in. And our children are paying the price. Continue reading →


  • Families need time together, away from their media devices

    10 simple ways to help your family unplug and reconnect this fall. Herald Times Online, August 31, 2015. A light-hearted and yet telling article. As the author points out, families are now inundated with media in many shapes and sizes. The key now is for families to face this problem

  • Seeking help for media addiction

    An article at once funny and sad. It's written by a bona fide internet addict who is undergoing treatment for his addiction at the Nightingale Hospital in London in a private clinic for individuals with this relatively new but quickly spreading form of addiction. Continue reading

  • Setting a bad example

    A telling and rather sad article about a very common experience in many American families: It's not just the kids who can't seem to disconnect from their media machines but also the parents. Continue reading

  • Limiting our teens’ access to media

    A great article about how concerned Catholic parents are dealing with their kids involvement with the internet. Though many parents, and certainly many American corporations, would disagree with these parents ways of proceeding, they do offer food for thought. Continue reading

  • Limiting screen time for kids

    A good summary article of the state of affairs in terms of screen time in childhood, its ill-effects on kids, and some approaches to making a difference. In terms of screen time, the figures are staggering with kids spending many, many hours per day in front of screens while only spending about a half hour daily reading. Continue reading

  • Medieval public shaming in the digital age

    A strange and troubling article that suggests some weird and nettling social trends. In the article an 11 year old girl sends a risque selfie to a same-age boy. The parents find out, and the father responds by cutting off her hair and then sending out social media pics of his hair-shorn child. Bereft and humiliated, the girl takes her life by jumping off a bridge. Continue reading

  • You can eat just one

    A humorous and telling article about the problem of over-eating and its connection with the culture at large. The author describes his grandfather, who grew up in Europe during WW II and who suffered at times from caloric deprivation. the author recalls an incident in which his grandfather enjoyed with much pleasure one Pringle and then put the container away and went on with his life. Continue reading