About the Author

George DrinkaGeorge F. Drinka, MD is a child and adolescent psychiatrist and the author of The Birth of Neurosis: Myth, Malady and the Victorians (Simon & Schuster).  He has also written for the New York Time Book Review and the Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association.

Dr. Drinka offers unique expertise in a numbers of areas related to the topic of his new book. In addition to his work with children and adolescents as a psychiatrist, he is a psychotherapist, a cultural historian and an acclaimed storyteller who focuses on the human condition. (See the reviews of The Birth of  Neurosis.) Hence he can offer original and probing insights into the interplay of  pop culture, American families, and children’s emotional lives.

When the Media is the ParentHe received his medical degree from Johns Hopkins Medical School and attended Oxford University where he undertook a graduate program in the Department of Modern History. There he worked on a dissertation in medical and cultural history and on reading and writing fiction. He then completed his psychiatric residency at Yale University and his fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at Boston Children’s Hospital.  He then joined the faculty at the Harvard Medical School as an Instructor while writing the final drafts of his first book, The Birth of Neurosis, which grew out of  his Oxford dissertation. Positively reviewed in many prominent publications, this book displays his expertise as an historian and psychiatrist and his verve for storytelling.

Dual certified in general psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, he has been on the clinical faculty of the Oregon Health Sciences University and in private practice in Portland, Oregon for more than twenty years. During these years, he became immersed in endless hours of therapy with children and adolescents who reveal to him their inner lives.  Through this clinical work, he became aware of how deeply, certain media creations and the pop culture more generally, have entered into the fantasy world and daydreams of American children and slowly, subtly shaped them. His new book, When the Media Is the Parent, is a culmination of  his work with children, his scholarly study of works on the media and American cultural history, and his dedication to writing stories that reveal the humanity in us all.

  • More arguments against overexposing kids to media violence

    A fine article penned by a child psychologist in Toronto, which lays out the compelling argument that violent media viewing, especially when undertaken in great amounts, plays a serious role in children behaving in a violent manner. This violence can involve verbal violence, bullying, pushing and shoving. But the notion that the child is simply being imitative is key. Continue reading

  • Studies on video game violence lack nuance

    A review of a recent study on the link between violent video games and real life violence among youths. Per usual, the study shows a link and per usual, the debate is how central violent video games are in fomenting violent acts versus other factors, like family violence or poverty. Continue reading

  • Our culture is steeped in violence
    Our culture is steeped in violence

    A timely article given the sheer number of mass shootings that are rocking the nation. The last two big ones - at the Planned Parenthood clinic and in San Bernadino - are beyond troubling... Continue reading

  • Families need time together, away from their media devices

    A light-hearted and yet telling article. As the author points out, families are now inundated with media in many shapes and sizes. The key now is for families to face this problem squarely and work quite consciously and deliberately to reclaim their kids and their families. Continue reading

  • Seeking help for media addiction

    An article at once funny and sad. It's written by a bona fide internet addict who is undergoing treatment for his addiction at the Nightingale Hospital in London in a private clinic for individuals with this relatively new but quickly spreading form of addiction. Continue reading

  • Setting a bad example

    A telling and rather sad article about a very common experience in many American families: It's not just the kids who can't seem to disconnect from their media machines but also the parents. Continue reading

  • Limiting our teens’ access to media

    A great article about how concerned Catholic parents are dealing with their kids involvement with the internet. Though many parents, and certainly many American corporations, would disagree with these parents ways of proceeding, they do offer food for thought. Continue reading