Studies on video game violence lack nuance

A review of a recent study on the link between violent video games and real life violence among youths. Per usual, the study shows a link and per usual, the debate is how central violent video games are in fomenting violent acts versus other factors, like family violence or poverty. Continue reading

Our culture is steeped in violence

HM Armed Forces action figures...Undated handout photo issued by Character Group of new HM Armed Forces action figures, (left to right) Royal Marine Commando, an Army infantryman, and a Royal Air Force pilot which are to go on sale from VE Day on Friday May 8. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday May 6, 2009. The Ministry of Defence has backed these authentic military-inspired dolls, which will go on sale from VE day on Friday.  The toys have been developed by Character Group, which has worked closely with the Army, Navy and RAF. See PA story DEFENCE Children. Photo credit should read: Character Group/PA Wire

A timely article given the sheer number of mass shootings that are rocking the nation. The last two big ones – at the Planned Parenthood clinic and in San Bernadino – are beyond troubling… Continue reading

Families need time together, away from their media devices

A light-hearted and yet telling article. As the author points out, families are now inundated with media in many shapes and sizes. The key now is for families to face this problem squarely and work quite consciously and deliberately to reclaim their kids and their families. Continue reading

Seeking help for media addiction

An article at once funny and sad. It’s written by a bona fide internet addict who is undergoing treatment for his addiction at the Nightingale Hospital in London in a private clinic for individuals with this relatively new but quickly spreading form of addiction. Continue reading

Setting a bad example

A telling and rather sad article about a very common experience in many American families: It’s not just the kids who can’t seem to disconnect from their media machines but also the parents. Continue reading

Limiting our teens’ access to media

A great article about how concerned Catholic parents are dealing with their kids involvement with the internet. Though many parents, and certainly many American corporations, would disagree with these parents ways of proceeding, they do offer food for thought. Continue reading

Limiting screen time for kids

A good summary article of the state of affairs in terms of screen time in childhood, its ill-effects on kids, and some approaches to making a difference. In terms of screen time, the figures are staggering with kids spending many, many hours per day in front of screens while only spending about a half hour daily reading. Continue reading

Medieval public shaming in the digital age

A strange and troubling article that suggests some weird and nettling social trends. In the article an 11 year old girl sends a risque selfie to a same-age boy. The parents find out, and the father responds by cutting off her hair and then sending out social media pics of his hair-shorn child. Bereft and humiliated, the girl takes her life by jumping off a bridge. Continue reading

You can eat just one

A humorous and telling article about the problem of over-eating and its connection with the culture at large. The author describes his grandfather, who grew up in Europe during WW II and who suffered at times from caloric deprivation. the author recalls an incident in which his grandfather enjoyed with much pleasure one Pringle and then put the container away and went on with his life. Continue reading

More on the effects of violent media

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A worthwhile article whose title is misleading and whose conclusion must be placed in context. The article involves about 200 kids whose media diet is calculated and whose proneness toward aggression is then evaluated through perceptions of their teachers. The conclusion is that kids who watch about 1 hour or less of violent media per day may actually be less violent than the average child, but children who watch three hours or more of violent media not only are more prone to aggression but also likely to perform more poorly in school. Continue reading